Author: Rob Reilly

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Southern Japan Shrine Depicts Alien Abduction

Does a statue at an ancient shrine in southern Japan depict an alien abduction?  Some Modern UFOlogists think it does. The statue represents an 8th century folktale. Urashima: Taro the Fisherman. In the tale, Taro saves the life of an injured tortoise who soon comes back as a beautiful princess. She takes him to her undersea palace where he is able to live and breathe underwater. But the homesick Taro convinces the young beauty to help him return. She takes him back and gives him a small wooden box as a parting gift – a gift he is never to...

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Sticks and Stones? Or Drones?

Are drones leading us to war? Albert Einstein once said that he didn’t know how World War III would be fought, though he did know about World War IV – with sticks and stones. He was warning us that our escalation of nuclear weapons would lead to a war where very little – and very few – were left standing. Today, what would Einstein think of the recent escalation of combat drones? Defense planners argue that drones save lives, sparing those who would’ve had to fight the enemy face to face, or gun-sight to gun-sight. Now, with drones, or UAVs (Unmanned Aerial...

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Alien Abduction in Japanese Folk Tale?

Does a statue at an ancient shrine in southern Japan depict an alien abduction? Some Modern UFOlogists think it does. The statue depicts the very old and popular legend of Urashima: Taro the Fisherman. In the 8th century folktale Taro saves the life of a injured tortoise and is rewarded with a journey to an undersea kingdom. There he sees many things of wonder, including a huge and luxurious subterranean palace. If that wasn’t enough, the tortoise he saved has now transformed herself into a beautiful princess. She brings Taro to her father, the Emperor, who thanks him for saving his...

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Please, No Buzzing in the War Room!

The War Room from Stanley Kubrick’s 1964 film “Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” Please, No Buzzing in the War Room! During the Cold War, one of the most crucial elements of survival was not food or water or even a deep enough bomb shelter; it was communication. As many know by now, ARPANET, the grandfather of the internet, was created by the Department of Defense to provide a backup system of networks in the event the unthinkable had happened. Well, the Cold War has ended, and the unthinkable is, well, not thought...

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Abandoned Air Force Station Haunted?

In a small town in the middle of Western Tokyo, there sits a patch of green. It’s not a garden or a somebody’s yard, it’s something quite different and unexpected. It’s an abandoned military base. But not just any base. It’s the former headquarters of all the U.S. Pacific Forces during the Cold War. The installation is hard to see. That’s because it’s covered up by nature. Overgrown. Though no one has worked there for years, it’s by no means lifeless. Why was it abandoned? And why did the US Forces move north away from the area? Some say the base was...

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Back to the Future of Recycling with a DeLorean

  Doc, you built a time machine…out of a DeLorean?  Well, not exactly. But some creative and enterprising people in Japan have come up with what could be next best thing. True, it may not be as good as a time machine made from a DeLorean, but it’s certainly got to be the coolest way to get people interested in recycling. Michihiko Iwamoto, when he’s not piloting a stainless steel dream machine is no slacker. He helms a  Tokyo company called Jeplan, that focuses on innovative recycling technologies. It’s through this firm that his DeLorean DMC-12, a carbon-copy of the one from...

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Hi-Tech Solution for Japan’s Suicide Problem

  Pressure, pushing down on me. Pressing down on you. Under Pressure. Remember those lines sung by David Bowie and Freddie Mercury? The song Under Pressure warned of the stressful toll that modern life takes on us all. If you watch the first part of the music video, you’ll see thousands of people being herded into packed commuter trains. It’s Tokyo, on a rail line most noted for suicides. Packed trains and stress are a way of life – and death – in Japan. And jumping in front of one is an all too common way to commit suicide and...